Saturday, May 30, 2015

James Davenport of Dorchester MA Family Line

Revolutionary War See Davenport Family Papers Memorial for James Davenport is in the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Collection at Williamsburg. It reads: In Memory of James Davenport of Dorchester who died July 15th 1824 aged 64 years and 9 months and Mrs. Esther Davenport his wife who died May 18th 1834 aged 68 and 8 months. Peace to Their Departed Spirits. It has a grave monument with urn and weeping willow over it with a women crying over the monument purchased in Boston in the 1930's by Rockefeller. The photo of the booties and epaulets, a silver spoon by a Boston silversmith and a Pine Tree Shilling framed dated 1779 that James had. The spoon has the initials ID - the I is the old form



James Davenport notes My Great Grandfather, Thomas Davenport lived in Quincy (Srgt. James, James, William, Thomas, Harold) James used to sit in the wing chair in front of his fireplace with the andirons and when they got hot spit on them so the spit sizzled - lots of hatred for the Hessians as well as the British soldiers. His brother Issac (also one of Washington's Lifeguards) was killed at the massacre at Tappan, NJ of Baylor's Dragoons (3rd Continental Dragoons) by General Grey's redcoats. Their Father was Issac and James had a son he named Issac.
An Historical Sketch of Union Lodge, from 1796 to 1876The history of Dorchester gives the names of the citizens of the town who served in the Revolutionary War and among them quite a number are identical with those which appear on the Lodge books The dates and the concurrent circumstances together with the fact that Masons have always been patriotic citizens render it more than probable that several of our ancient Brethren in Dorchester were soldiers in the Continental army in the days that tried men's souls The history mentioned informs us that James Davenport then the Senior Warden of the Lodge was presented with a sword by General Lafayette and our Senior Past Master has heard the second James Davenport speak of the sword as in possession of his father.

From History of Dorchester 
Three worthy townsmen James Davenport Stephen Badlam and Wm Badlam were in the army and that the former received the present of a sword from Lafayette Prince Darby was a slave and the name Cesar Thacher seems to denote that he was one also The former was purchased by Dea Edw Pierce and Samuel Howe and his freedom given to him on the condition that he would enlist for three years

James D. (1759-1824,  8th and 9th Mass Continentals and Lafayette's Light Infantry Brigade) and wife Esther Mellish. They had 11 children.  Dorchester
James D. (1796-1852, cabinet maker), wife Abigail Dean Lord (b.1801). Dorchester
William (1831-1902), wife Abigail Newcomb Billings (1834-1907). Quincy
Thomas Billings D. (1863-1945), wife Flora Arabella Lee. Quincy
Harold Lee D. (1887-1970's), wife Miriam Hopkins Cook. Longmeadow
Miriam Davenport  (1907-2001), husband James B. Richardson Jr (1907-1995). Longmeadow
James B. Richardson (1936-). Longmeadow and Pittsburgh.

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