Thursday, December 3, 2015

"M" Standish Trap migrated with Native Americans or another Standish altogether?




A photo of a Standish trap. I've had this trap in my collection for about 30 years. It has teeth in the jaws and is larger than most of the Standish traps I've seen. Miles Standish was a seventh generation descendant of Captain Myles Standish of Plymouth Colony. He made traps for the American Fur Company and other fur companies from 1821 to 1868.

1936 Washington Evening Star article


The Daily Telegram 1953












From Hunter-trader-trapper, Volume 11 1905
OLD TRAPPER'S NOTES. O G Wells. My two sons, Archie and James, and I have been taking the H-T-T and we have been much interested in the questions and inquiries. I see in November's issue. Brother Frazier found an old fashioned trap marked M. Standish, and wanted to know who made traps like that. Undoubtedly it is one of Marquer Standish's makes, a French blacksmith who lived below St. Paul. Minn. I do not know just where, as I was very small then. He made a great many traps for my father. My father established an Indian trading post on the west" bank of Lake Pippen Minn., in 1833. He was a hunter, trader and trapper, and one of the first members of the Minnesota legislature, and it was at this post that I was born in 1840. and It was in one of this style trap that I caught my first coon when I was six years old. Infact, all the traps I saw in those days were made with the bottoms melded together.
See  M.Standish hand forged trap



From 1935 Hamlin Herald Texas


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