Saturday, December 7, 2013

Lord Timothy Dexter House turn to Caldwell's Inn




"Lord" Timothy Dexter See Article of Newburyport met his maker in 1806, but his memory and his dwelling house was kept alive so the people of the Port and tourists could still make merry sport and good cheer with all the chief characters of the land. Sarah Emery states that Dexter's home was"his full glory" in its heyday: "a noted place for pleasure parties. A delightful spot in summer, and a noted rendezvous for sleighing parties in winter, when a supper and dance were enjoyed."
The party house would become known known as Caldwell Inn & Tavern. From History of Newburyport: "William Caldwell, an innkeeper who occupied the Dexter house on High street for several years."
This advertisement from The Newburyport Herald 


William Caldwell apparently had some trouble in his new hot spot with a fellow guest who swindled his way through the Port.  From the Newburyport Herald Friday May 24, 1811



From Newburyport Herald Febuary 23 1830





William Swain
son of  Levi Swain and Phebe Pilsbury
This is history of owners recorded in Old Newburyport Houses by W. B. Clarke Co. 1912 Caldwell is not listed.
Jonathan Jackson                       until 1795                                                   
Thomas Thomas and heirs         1795-1798
Timothy Dexter and heirs           1798-1852
Elbridge G. Kelley                     1852-1874
Emily A. (Mrs. George H.) Corliss   1874-1897
Mary B. (Mrs. Alexander) Johnson and heirs   1897-1902
Nathaniel G. Pierce                    1902-1909
George P. Sargent                      1909
    Mrs. Katherine Tingley               1909

Madame Tingley, former owner was quite an eccentric herself. She was a member of The Universal Brotherhood and Theosophical Society and formed her own league in October 1915.


She grew up in Newburyport and her intentions for her childhood home was the buzz around the port. Here is an ad in The Boston Journal December 19, 1907


4 comments:

  1. Very interesting! It may be worth checking the house's lineage on the salem title website, which has information back to 1680.

    Also, interesting info about Tingley. Tyler Tingley was head of Philips Exeter for a while prior to 2009...wonder if there is a genealogical connection?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Jack

    Thanks for reading and posting! I really appreciate it! I need to check on that connection. Tinley was a very interesting woman that is for sure i will let you know what I find!

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  3. I was curious why Caldwell wasn't listed as an owner - he clearly is not in the line of titles. As it turns out, Currier may have gotten it right (Ould Newbury,p 576): Timothy Dexter Dies, followed by his wife in 1809. His daughter Nancy Dexter Bishop takes possession, but had moved to New Haven. She leaves an unhappy marriage, and comes back to live in the house, with an arrangement with Thomas Marshall and his family. Apparently Nancy had a drinking problem, and needed assistance with the estate. It may have been during this period (1810-1850) that Caldwell also ran the inn, with the Marshalls and Nancy also living on the property. That needs more research. What is certain is that Nancy dies in 1852, and leaves it to her daughter: Mary Ann Clark (also of New Haven CT). Clark sells it to Kelley, and from that point on the titles are quite clear.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I was curious why Caldwell wasn't listed as an owner - he clearly is not in the line of titles. As it turns out, Currier may have gotten it right (Ould Newbury,p 576): Timothy Dexter Dies, followed by his wife in 1809. His daughter Nancy Dexter Bishop takes possession, but had moved to New Haven. She leaves an unhappy marriage, and comes back to live in the house, with an arrangement with Thomas Marshall and his family. Apparently Nancy had a drinking problem, and needed assistance with the estate. It may have been during this period (1810-1850) that Caldwell also ran the inn, with the Marshalls and Nancy also living on the property. That needs more research. What is certain is that Nancy dies in 1852, and leaves it to her daughter: Mary Ann Clark (also of New Haven CT). Clark sells it to Kelley, and from that point on the titles are quite clear.

    ReplyDelete